Investment Bankers And Predatory Lenders Combined To Make Risky, Deceptive Mortgage Loans To Naïve Home Buyers Who Purchased Homes They Couldn’t Afford

17 12 2008

“…The widespread securitization of mortgages prompted lenders to give virtually anyone a loan that they could resell at a profit while offloading the risk. It also gave them incentive to mislead borrowers about what they could afford, what risks they were undertaking and, in some cases, the terms of the mortgage they were signing. The public face of this racket could well be Angelo Mozilo, co-founder of mortgage giant Countrywide Financial…”

“…though the poster child of mismanagement has to be Richard Fuld, former CEO of the former company known as Lehman Bros. Fuld, who received as much as $480 million in compensation from 2000 to this year, took risks that drove the storied investment house straight into the ground…”

 

http://blogs.usatoday.com/oped/2008/12/whos-to-blame-f.html

 

Investment bankers

In the war on drugs, the top target is always the traffickers. The same principle is true with the massive implosion of credit markets and corporate ethics. In this case, the traffickers were the Wall Street firms that created bundles of subprime mortgages and other toxic financial instruments, then peddled them as low-risk, high-return investments. These securities, and enormous side bets on them, fueled the housing bubble and infected the global financial system.

Nearly all the big investment banks were culpable, though the poster child of mismanagement has to be Richard Fuld, former CEO of the former company known as Lehman Bros. Fuld, who received as much as $480 million in compensation from 2000 to this year, took risks that drove the storied investment house straight into the ground. But he had lots of co-conspirators.

Predatory lenders

Lending is easy when it is someone else’s money. The widespread securitization of mortgages prompted lenders to give virtually anyone a loan that they could resell at a profit while offloading the risk. It also gave them incentive to mislead borrowers about what they could afford, what risks they were undertaking and, in some cases, the terms of the mortgage they were signing. The public face of this racket could well be Angelo Mozilo, co-founder of mortgage giant Countrywide Financial. But many others got into this game, as well. Subprime lending shot up from $130 billion in 2000 to $625 billion in 2005.

Clueless borrowers

It might seem cruel to put blame on people who have lost their homes, or are in jeopardy of it. But hundreds of thousands of homebuyers bought more house than they could afford, or financed investment properties with no clue about what they were doing. It takes two parties to sign a mortgage contract, so some borrowers share responsibility for the housing mess.

 

 

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